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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
, they should go after me. and i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador, who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. >> well, senator mccain heard that remark. 73 minutes later took to the floor of the u.s. senate to respond. >> mr. president, four brave americans died. it has now been eight weeks and the american people have received nothing but contradictory statements from all levels of our government. this president and this administration has either been guilty of colossal incompetence, or engaged in a cover-up, neither of which are acceptable to the american people. >> keeping then honest, more than two months after the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, there are still some serious questions about the timeline of the events and specifically the administration's response in the days and weeks that followed. specifically, why didn't the president call it an act of terrorism? the president said, "it was quote
to the attacks from the israeli side. this is the challenge egyptians negotiate with the u.n. officials today including the secretary-general as well as turkey's prime minister and regional leaders participating in these talks. tamron. >> we got information in from the white house that following his dinner tonight, president barack obama called president morsi of egypt. he spoke with the israeli prime minister netanyahu of israel getting an update on the situation as it stands in more detail from the white house indicating president obama called morsi. the two leaders discussed wayed to de-escalate the situation in gaza, and the president underscored the necessity of hamas ending fire into israel. that's the latest information. thank you. as i mentioned, more than 100 rockets have been fired from gaza into southern israel. you heard ayman refer to that happening today alone. many rockets fired into israel have been intercepted by the country's missile defense system. it is known as the iron dome. nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk joins me from tel aviv. this missile defense that we talk s
bolton, the american ambassador to the u.n. under george w. bush. really one of the great guys to play my favorite game called gay or republican. play that any time you see a white guy with a mustache. bo derek has a birthday today. born in 1956. mark gastineau was born on the same day of course. sean young you remember sean young? blade runner. >> oh. >> john: no way out. '80s icon shawn young has a birthday today. mike d. of the beastie boys turns 47. biggest birthday of all, vice president joe biden. i love joe biden. i really do. i think -- i knew barack obama was going to become president when he got the nomination in 2008. everyone said oh, my god the first after man american -- african-american to -- he had a plan to pick a vice president that would guarantee zero assassination attempts and that's joe biden. barack obama comes throughout and says you want to kill me, here's what you get the crazy middle-aged white guy who is a crazy liberal and has plugs. i thank you joe biden. your true liberal
and got the cease-fire. our president, secretary of state, ambassador rice in the u.n. all gushed praise upon morsi and elevated him to the state us of global statesman. it was a terrible mistake because he hadn't earned that, and the next day he thumbed his nose, to put it politely at our government and the west entirely and said, i'm now in charge, i'll do what i want, egypt is going to do what i say, and, by the way, the revolution is over. megyn: does it make it tougher for us to now condemn what he's doing? so far we've had jay carney say we support democracy, we believe the government in egypt should reflect the will of the people, we have concerns about what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy. but i don't think this administration does. let's be honest, george w. bush tried to support democracy in the middle east and in iraq we gave the iraqis their best shot. about five years ago, six years ago i ran into a buzz saw right and left for saying eventually iraq could be governed by a strongman again. today we have mcmc wee-wee we h have such a person. megy
haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since 1967 and really since not long after that when sadat, the relationship has been peaceful. it's been codified by treaty. it is the basis of peace in the middle east to the extent it exists at all. what this shows is we can no longer take that for granted. now that you've had the political change in egypt, you can't
aviv as hopes grow for a mediation effort led by the u.n. attorney general. back at home congressional leaders start a fiscal cliff conversation before a post election vacation. will they have anything to be thankful for when everyone gets back to work and the clock really starts ticking? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 19, 2012, and this is "the daily rundown." no, it's not chuck todd. the president is in cambodia this morning, his final stop on a three nation tour of southeast asia. after wrapping up the first trip to myanmar by a sitting u.s. president, chuck joins us now with the latest on the president's trip. >> well, good morning. i'm here in myanmar, a country that just a few years ago was virtually isolated from the world's community and now a united states president has visited the country, barack obama. he made a whirlwind 12 hours count when he landed and touched down he was greeted by a sea of folks here, some of them locals looked spontaneous. some of them uniformed schoolchildren, looked like it was very organized. but throngs of people hoping to catc
of north korea. one is the new regime of kim jong-un, was just one years old, needed to improve living conditions of the people. to that end, they wanted -- they may have wanted to have better relations with japan. that's one reason. the second reason for north korea diplomatically, the united states is a most important country. they would like to have relations, encounters with the united states. in order to pave the way to that end, they wanted to have good relations with japan as a precursor. >> what are the prospects for improvement in relations between pyongyang and tokyo? there are so many issues that need to be solved between the two countries. >> yes, there are so many. among them, most did i feel, important ones, there are three. one is abduction issues. number two -- not in the order of the priority, two is missile testing and nuclear problems. the third one, economic cooperation. those are three difficult issues or barriers. it's not so easy to solve those issues at once. perhaps it need time and endurance, efforts, special efforts, on both sides. out of them, perhaps most t
controversial coming out of these briefings, whether or not susan rice, the u.n. ambassador -- the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., had the proper information or was correct in what she said publicly about the attack being probably at that point four days after the attack because of a demonstration. democrats are really to a person coming to her defense aggressively and trying to explain why there was a discrepancy. listen to kent conrad of the democratic member of the senate health care community. >> what is very clear is that ambassador rice used the talking points that the intelligence committee had all signed off on. that is very, very clear. she used the unclassified talking points that were signed off on by the entire intelligence community, so criticisms of her are completely unwarranted. that is very clear. >> and susan, dianne feinstein, just moments ago actually took out and read the unclassified talking points that susan rice used on that day, and they were very short. it sounds like there were two, maybe three points in the talking points, and it was almost certain to change.
.com. ♪ campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because they think she's an easy target, then they've got a problem with me. megyn: that was president obama yesterday defending u.n. ambassador susan rice for her response in the days following the terrorist attack in benghazi in what has now become one of the largest conflicts for his administration, at least on the terrorism front. the president's remarks yesterday raise new questions over the conflicting accounts from the white house about the deadly attack. here's why. on september 11th, four americans were killed -- you know that now -- in our consulate in benghazi, including our ambassador. it was a terrorist attack. on the 16th of september, five days later, ambassador rice went on five sunday shows, including fox news sunday, and suggested that the attack was linked to an internet video. >> best assessment we have today is that, in fact, this was not a preplanned, premeditated attack, that what happened initially was it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo
for the past four u.n. ambassadors to the u.n. mohammed morsi was something of a hero to the united states when he helped broker that cease-fire between israel and hamas in gaza. now what is going on. >> my, what six weeks will do. six weeks ago we had president obama saying that egypt and morsi wasn't really an enemy and they weren't really our friend. wasn't an ally. six weeks later we see secretary of state hillary clinton gushing over the fact that egypt was able to broker this cease-fire. clearly, jon, the cease-fire is great news, and i think that the egyptian president does deserve credit for brokering this. he went in to gaza, he tried to do what he could. i think most observers were a little bit uncomfortable with wh he was saying inside gaza and i think he came down on hamas' side a little bit too much. he is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. we were a little bit concerned with his actions. but then when the cease-fire happened secretary of state hillary clinton stood next to him and really just gushed over the fact that he was able to produce this cease-fire. then you saw -- jon: d
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
writing a letter to president obama opposing the idea of nominating the current u.n. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, to secretary of state. it feels like on the domestic front we have a fiscal cliff and we're going to work things out, but there's still a lot of kind of opposition and you can hear in mccain's voice a dislike for where the president is heading. what does the republican party do now? cut deals? where do they go? we know where they went after 2008. they unified against obama. it worked for them in 2010. why did it not work in 2012? >> i think both sides will have to consolidate their bases. find out how much leeway each side has. and then they can come to the table and say, all right, can we raise rates or raise are revenue a little bit. can we cut -- how much can we cut entitlements? how much will the two sides be able to give and i think though you see in john boehner and in president obama two people who are willing to work together if they can get the wings, the fringe wings of either side to kind of get onboard and come together. >> you know, one
deal off the ground? one decision facing the president in the next week, will u.n. ambassador susan rice be his nominee to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state or will it be john kerry? they are the two contenders in the spotlight as it is intensified by republicans. a new wave of protests in cairo as egypt's president expands his power on the heels of helping to broker a ceasefire between israel and hamas. >>> new egyptian leader, same old story for the u.s. relationship? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 26, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. welcome back from the long break. let's get right to my first reads of the morning. congressional leaders return to washington this week and with just 36 days left to avert the so-called fiscal cliff becoming more apparent that senate republicans want a deal and they would like one pretty quick. but while there may be a bi-p t bipartisan consensus to raise taxes on the wealthy, the sides are still far apart on where the revenue will come from. staff level negotiations are a little bit more than stal
that in the '90s, we had several examples of massive united nations led interventions where the u.n. move in and establish a presence at a governance in iraq and afghanistan, it was u.s. and nato-led. but in the middle east and north africa particularly in these three countries we were discussing, something new is happening. this is the international community learning how to do things different. we are not going back to what we've done in the last 20 years. we're going to do this in a different way. and i think as an international community where learning what that processes. if you on the ground you can see. there's a lot of things going on, a lot of people there but there's a hesitancy about this intervention. and this involvement. that is quite telling. it wasn't there, you know, in the past. >> thank you. >> yes, i'd like to know how -- i'm abigail woodward and the like to know how women's rights are being protected and advanced. and i like to know if the muslim brotherhood is seen as the main impediment to that, and other constitutions are including them? >> let's start perhaps with
is that susan rice who is a u.n. ambassador that went on all the talk shows the sunday after the attack was right based on the testimony that i heard yesterday and what they just heard from david petraeus. listen to democrat adam shif. >> the assessment, the upclassified assessment was there best assessment and that could be provided publicly without compromising sources and methods, and the ambassador's statement tracked that unclassified assessment very precisely. so the ambassador statement provided the information that could be provided without providing classified information. >> david petraeus is still on capitol hill as far as we know. he went from this house meeting here right across this visitors center where we are now underneath the capitol to the senate side where he is testifying and i say we believe because we don't know for sure. they're making every effort to keep him away from the public. no one has seen them. cass kafr us in down here. there are a lot of ways to get around. the people that provided him here and his protection are making sure, at least trying, that we d
on the one hand to not take their decision to push for statehood to the u.n. on november 28, that is why secretary of state clinton met with barack obama earlier today, if you think you can get them to control the thoughts and so there is no more rocket fire out, then we won't send him those roundtrips. but this is a very tenuous agreement at best at the way the different parties and what they have agreed to. megyn: you make it sound like an egg shell -- an egg shell peas. even those who call themselves jihadist can crack themselves by one gunshot and the deal is off. benjamin netanyahu is going to speak momentarily, so we will find out when the english translation will come. earlier you reported that it was unusual for israel to agree to a peace deal like this on a day in which a bus attack happened in tel aviv. when you say that? >> well, i think it's very unusual. that is a position of weakness. if you have a situation where a bomb has gone off on a bus in tel aviv, the first time there's been a terror attack since 2006 in tel aviv, the first bus bombings since 2004 in tel aviv, that
mccain is softening his attacks on u.n. ambassador susan rice after vowing to block her potential nomination as secretary of state. republicans claim ambassador rice deliberately misled the country in the aftermath of the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. but rice says that she's not to blame, arguing she relied on the talking points from the intelligence community. although mccain had threatened a senate filibuster earlier this month, he's now open to meeting directly with miss rice. >> is there anything that ambassador rice can do to change your mind about it? >> sure. she can -- i give everyone the benefit of explaining their position and the actions that they took. and i'll be glad to have the opportunity to discuss these issues with her. >> she could conceivably get your vote for secretary of state? >> i think she deserves the ability and the opportunity to explain herself and her position. >> the white house says no decisions have been made as far as cabinet selections for the president's second term. and john heilemann, part of what you wrote about th
relations with israel, the role of the security council and in the city council in the u.n. almost everything important is at stake in this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at in the wind while this year is critical we have to realize this isn't all about some misunderstanding or fixable problem with iran not to getting about its civil nuclear program or even its nuclear weapons program colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we and the rest of the region has with iran at least since the 1970's and this confrontation will go on regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or have a strike to prevent iran from moving to that nuclear weapons capability. we are going to have to deal with this problem over the longer term just as we have the last 30 years because it flows from kuran's view of its role in the region and the inconsistency of the view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values and our role both in t
. s. -- un security council held a closed- door consultation instead. following the consultations, members heard a report from the secretary. this is 50 minutes. >> a meeting of the security council is called to order. the provisional agenda of this meeting is the situation in the middle east, including the palestinian question. the agenda is adopted. the security council will now begin its consideration of item number two of the agenda. on behalf of the council, i welcome the secretary general, his excellency, mr. ban ki-moon who is joining the conversation at via telephone conference. i now give the floor to the secretary. >> thank you, distinguished members of the council, excellencies, ladies and gentleman. thank you for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a
is where the u.n. moved and established a presence and governments in iraq in afghanistan and was u.s. invasion, but in north africa, particularly in these countries we are discussing, something new is happening. this might think, in some respects is the international community learning how to do things into for ways. certainly we are not coming back to what we have done over the last 20 years. we are going to do this into for weight. as an engine mastectomy we are learning what the processes, and if you're on the ground you can see there are a lot of things are gonna people. there's a hesitancy about this intervention in this involvement that is quite telling and was not there, you know. >> interesting. thank you. >> yes. >> identify yourself. >> deal woodward, and i would like to know how women's rights are being protected and advanced, and i would like to know if the muslim brotherhood is seen as the main impediment to that and how the constitution's are including them. >> let's start, perhaps, with the most significant case, the constitutional issues in the role of the muslim br
, sort it all out. he will also say he had his own talking points separate from u.n. ambassador susan rice. that came from somewhere other in the administration than his direct talking point. so he wants to get all this sorted out. he believes it was the al qaeda sympathizer group ansar al sharia that was responsible for the attacks. >> so the question, barbara, is he is convinced that the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi had nothing, nothing to do with that anti-muslim video that'd been posted on youtube, that this was a terrorist attack by this al qaeda affiliated organization. the question is though, when did he reach that final conclusion? did he know that before susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations went on those five sunday shows and insisted what happened in benghazi was the result of spontaneous anger from that anti-muslim video? >> all the i can tell you, wolf, is this source says the intelligence reports that came in blaming the video, those 20 or so reports, this source says petraeus had those reports disproved over time after he testified or rather
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)